Chat bots

29 Feb

which proposed what is now called the Turing test as a criterion of intelligence.This criterion depends on the ability of a computer program to impersonate a human in a real-time written conversation with a human judge, sufficiently well that the judge is unable to distinguish reliably—on the basis of the conversational content alone—between the program and a real human.The notoriety of Turing's proposed test stimulated great interest in Joseph Weizenbaum's program ELIZA, published in 1966, which seemed to be able to fool users into believing that they were conversing with a real human.

Thus, for example, online help systems can usefully employ chatbot techniques to identify the area of help that users require, potentially providing a "friendlier" interface than a more formal search or menu system. One pertinent field of AI research is natural language processing. Chatbots are often integrated into the dialog systems of, for example, virtual assistants, giving them the ability of, for example, small talking or engaging in casual conversations unrelated to the scopes of their primary expert systems.The classic historic early chatbots are ELIZA (1966) and PARRY (1972). Companies like Nordea Bank, Domino's, Pizza Hut, Disney, and Whole Foods have launched their own chatbots to increase end customer engagement The newer generation of chatbots includes IBM Watson-powered "Rocky", introduced in February 2017 by the New York City-based startup and e-commerce platform Rare Carat to assist novice diamond buyers through the daunting process of purchasing a diamond.Other companies explore ways how they can use chatbots internally, for example for Customer Support, Human Resources, or even in Internet-of-Things (Io T) projects.With that thought he moves the program in question from the shelf marked "intelligent", to that reserved for curios ... is still purely based on pattern matching techniques without any reasoning capabilities, the same technique ELIZA was using back in 1966.The object of this paper is to cause just such a re-evaluation of the program about to be "explained". ELIZA's key method of operation (copied by chatbot designers ever since) involves the recognition of cue words or phrases in the input, and the output of corresponding pre-prepared or pre-programmed responses that can move the conversation forward in an apparently meaningful way (e.g. This is not strong AI, which would require sapience and logical reasoning abilities.